Recipes starting with R

    Rabbit (or Chicken) with Thyme

    Rabbit (or Chicken) with Thyme

    A simple supper dish which can be cooked in one pot.  Stir in creme fraiche or cream at the end of the cooking time for a special occasion.

    • Time: 2 hours
    • Complexity: easy

    Raspberry Shrub (Drinking Vinegar)

    Raspberry Shrub (Drinking Vinegar)

    Drinking Vinegars, or Shrubs as they are also known are not new, but becoming popular again. Created since the 17th Century as a method to preserve fruit in vinegar, then sweetened with sugar to make a syrup to mix with soda, hot or cold water, or as a base for a cocktail. Try adding some crushed sweet cicely seeds to the strained liquid and sugar for a hint of aniseed.

     

    • Time: 48 hrs to macerate and then 30 mins to make and bottle
    • Complexity: medium

    Red Onion Marmalade

    Red Onion Marmalade

    Sweet and sticky onion marmalade that we like to serve with either cheese or a smooth chicken liver pate.

    • Time: 40 minutes
    • Complexity: easy

    Red Poll Shin and Oxtail Stew

    Red Poll Shin and Oxtail Stew

    Red Poll is a native breed of Suffolk producing excellent beef. Your local butcher will be able to provide a whole oxtail and cut it into sections for you. Use well sourced meat that has been hung for at least 28 days. The stew must be slow cooked until the meat falls from the bones. Try and use shin if possible as although it takes longer to cook it makes a gorgeous more gelatinous, sticky and lip smacking gravy. It's a cheaper cut too.
    This recipe is great for slow cooking on a camp fire fire and I always make it in my South African Potjie over smouldering logs. It works just as well made in a casserole or saucepan and cooked in the oven.

    • Time: Full cooking time is 4 hrs. Can be made ahead.
    • Complexity: medium

    Redcurrant Jelly

    Redcurrant Jelly

    Redcurrant jelly is traditionally served with roast lamb. I like it spread on toast for breakfast and also use it to glaze fruit tarts and flans, or dolloped onto some natural yoghurt for breakfast. To make a firmer and stronger flavoured jelly do not use the water but you must watch the redcurrants carefully and stir to prevent them from catching on the bottom of the pan.

    • Time: 10 minutes then overnight to strain through a jelly bag then a further 15/20 minutes
    • Complexity: medium

    Rice Pudding

    Rice Pudding

    This rice pudding is a little healthier and lower in fat than our other full cream recipe. You bake it in the oven - it takes minutes to prepare and two hours to cook. Well worth the wait! Try adding a bay leaf or some lemon zest for an exciting and interesting flavour.

    • Time: Two hours
    • Complexity: very easy

    Ricotta doughnuts

    Ricotta doughnuts

    Moreish and quick to make, these little ricotta doughnuts are lovely with a morning coffee or also delicious served as a dessert, with a dipping sauce of fresh fruit puree or chocolate. (Stewed and sieved blackcurrant sauce is my favourite.) There is no need to use a deep fat fryer to cook the doughnuts if you do not have one. Shallow oil, about 2/3cm in the bottom of a heavy based frying pan works very well. You will just need to turn them more often.

    • Time: 20 to 30 minutes
    • Complexity: easy

    Roasted Rhubarb and Orange Compote

    Roasted Rhubarb and Orange Compote

    You can't beat the flavour and colour of the new seasons' forced rhubarb. Look out for it in January when it brings a welcome lift to the seasonal fruit offering. Eat this compote on yoghurt for breakfast, or with rice pudding, or on top of a cheesecake or just enjoy it as it is.

    • Time: 30 minutes plus cooling
    • Complexity: very easy

    Rub for a Barbecue Rib-Eye or Sirloin of Beef

    Rub for a Barbecue Rib-Eye or Sirloin of Beef

    Spice blends, commonly called dry rubs are rubbed into meat before cooking. Ideally salt should not be included in a rub and meat should be dry brined by rubbing in salt a day in advance, in order for the salt to penetrate the meat. The spices in a rub do not tend to penetrate the meat but will help form the delicious spicy crust (or bark, as they call it down South). However as we are all so short of time in our busy lives I suggest mixing the salt into the rub and leaving it overnight in the fridge. Sugar is a matter of taste and needed to help caramelise the crust. I use just a little on beef. Experiment with your own spice blends and store in an airtight jar. Use a whole piece of rib eye or sirloin, or if you prefer individual steaks.

    • Time: 10 minutes for the rub.
    • Complexity: easy