Tuesday, 06 August 2019 12:19

    A souffle for supper

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    I made this for supper last night with a bag of swiss chard grown by my cousin Jo. Posting the pics on Instagram has obviously whetted a few appetites so here's the recipe. A savoury souffle is not as hard as it looks and can turn very economical ingredients into a luxurious dish. For a perfectly fluffy and towering souffle, remember no peeking while it's cooking. Put it in the oven (don't slam the door or you'll knock the air out) and patiently wait for the cooking time to elapse. Experiment by using different cheeses and swap spinach for mushrooms, cooked leeks, roasted peppers or anything else you fancy.

    Sunday, 28 July 2019 18:04

    Easy peasy lemon squeezy

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    I just made this delicious squidgy lemon and lime curd shortbread. It's for pudding tonight but Scarlett and I can't stop ourselves, so maybe there'll be none left by then.

    Tuesday, 21 May 2019 16:25

    Savoury Red Bean and Cashew Rice for Supper

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    One of my go to recipes when I fancy a meat free meal which is wholesome and healthy. From my Second Chalice Recipe Book and copied into my online Recipe Book now.

    Tuesday, 26 March 2019 12:41

    Crystallised flowers to decorate a Mother's Day cake

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    It's the perfect time of year to crystallise spring flowers. I love making these beautiful and natural decorations to add a splash of colour to a special Mother's Day cake. Primroses, wood violets and viola's are at their best right now but apple blossom, borage flowers, rose petals and nasturtiums all work well too. You'll see I've also crystallised a few sprigs of mint. Make sure the flowers haven't been sprayed with chemicals and pick leaving a long stem to hold on to. Don't wash them, they must be bone dry.

    You will need. One egg white thinned and lightly fork whisked with a teaspoon of vodka. Caster sugar. A small paint brush.

     

    Sunday, 10 September 2017 21:26

    Tarragon Cream with Blackberries

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    The first of the blackberries and it's beginning to feel like autumn. I created this recipe for an article I wrote for the Herb Society. Tarragon usually survives in my garden until the first winter frosts and it lends a warming aniseed flavour if used generously in a Coq au Vin. It is excellent in egg dishes and with vegetables such as Jerusalem artichokes, mushrooms and marrow. Its warm flavour makes it a perfect contrast to pulses and it is delicious with flageolet beans and nearly always better in cooked dishes than served raw. It is an essential ingredient of fines herbes and béarnaise sauce. However with its liquorice like flavour, fresh tarragon marries particularly well (and interestingly) in fresh cream desserts and served with blackberries or poached plums has to be the ultimate autumn dessert.

    Tarragon Cream (makes 6)

    600 ml double cream

    150 ml milk

    4 large sprigs tarragon

    3 sheets leaf gelatine

    140g caster sugar

    Method

    Place the gelatine leaves in a bowl and cover with cold water

    Put the cream, milk, sugar and tarragon in a heavy based saucepan and bring slowly to the boil.

    Or place together in a jug and microwave.

    Remove from the heat and add the softened gelatine, squeezing out any excess water out first.

    Stir well and then strain through a sieve into a jug.

    Divide the mixture between six ramekins or glasses.

    Place in the fridge until set.

    (Can be turned out like a jelly if preferred)

     

    Thursday, 11 May 2017 18:06

    Rook Pie

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    May 13th. Today's the day, my dear old Dad would say to make a rook pie. How I miss him.

    Monday, 08 May 2017 15:30

    #nationaldoughnutweek

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    Go eat doughnuts! It's #NationalDoughnutWeek raising money for The Children's Trust. Here we have (starting at the back) a traditional jam, a lemon meringue, a dulce de leche and a sprinkle covered cherry doughnut, all from The Ice Cook School at Rougham. £1 each. They're mine, so go and get your own; they are available everyday this week. PS...they have gluten free ring doughnuts too!

    Thursday, 20 April 2017 17:14

    Thinking about summer...my guide to good jam making

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    It will soon be time to think about jam making with summer fruit. My tips are from my 'Food for Keeps' course and will help you make perfect jam every time. Try making this delicious Fresh Apricot Jam.

    • Never make more than 10lb (10 standard jars) at any time. The less time spent in cooking the jam, the better the final colour and flavour.
    • Choose firmly ripe, fresh fruit, picked dry. Wet fruit will affect the set and flavour of the jam.
    • Prepare the fruit removing any stalks and bruised flesh, only wash if necessary.
    • Use a large, heavy based saucepan. The pan should never be more than half full.
    • Add water only of the recipe says so.
    • Bring fruit to the boil, then simmer gently to break down any skin and to extract the pectin.
    • Pectin is a substance in fruit that reacts with acid when heated, creating the setting agent. Fruits vary in their pectin and acid content.
    • Jam sugar has added pectin and is ideal for fruits that are low in pectin helping jam to set.
    • Do not cover the pan as water evaporation is essential.
    • Underboiling causes jam to be too runny and overboiling makes it sticky.
    • Test the set by dropping a spoonful of jam onto a refrigerated saucer and seeing if the top crinkles when you run your finger or a spoon across it.
    • Warming the sugar in a low oven (110C) will shorten the cooking time. Preserving sugar consists of large crystals of sugar which dissolve evenly producing less froth when boiling.
    • Remove any scum with a slotted spoon once the jam is ready to pot. A nut sized piece of butter at the end of the cooking will help reduce the scum.
    • Cool the jam for 5 to 10 mins before potting, then stir again to help evenly distribute the fruit and stop it from rising to the top of the jars.
    • Always warm jars in a low oven to sterilise and prevent cracking from the hot jam.
    Monday, 18 April 2016 16:40

    Herb butter

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    We had a big family celebration party at the weekend and ended up with a fridge full of leftovers, including a load of butter and selection of fresh herbs. So we made herb butter. This is how ... Snap off any thick stalks, wash and dry the herbs in a salad spinner to remove excess water. Break large pieces of room temperature butter into smaller pieces and drop evenly into the blender. Whizz for a few minutes and if needed gently poke the butter down into the herbs with a plastic spoon. You will need to do this if the butter is too cold and hard. The butter should mix evenly with the herbs. Spoon the mixture onto grease proof paper and roll into a sausage shape. Twist the ends of the paper to seal. If you want to store the herb butter in smaller quantities cut into discs once the butter has hardened in the fridge. Repack in grease proof paper and store in a plastic tub in the deep freeze until required. Remember to label the packages.Parsley gives a wonderful green tint to the mixture. The butter can be smeared on meat before barbequeing, or on grilled fish and steak. Mint is slightly less verdant than parsley but the butter is delicious added to omlettes or mixed into peas. Dill butter goes wonderfully well with salmon - and is also a great accompaniment to gently scrambled eggs. Add zest of lemon to your dill butter for extra flavour. If you don't have any pesto add basil butter to pasta dishes. Your favourite herb butter can be used to add flavour to jacket potatoes or spread onto warm bread.

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